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12 September 2014

Black Walnut: Juglans nigra

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

2012.4.5 corinna purThe black walnut (Juglans nigra) can be hard to miss at this time of year—or to mistake for anything else. There are other regional trees with pinnate leaves that have a similar appearance but as we move toward fall, an abundance of yellowish-green “tennis balls”—the fallen fruits—covers the ground around the base of black walnut trees.

green blk walnutsI adore black walnut’s edible nutmeat—it has a richer, more complex flavor than the supermarket variety European walnut. Nutritionally, black walnuts are dense with proteins and essential fatty acids, wonderful for heart health. But the prized meats are nestled deep inside those greenish balls, and it takes a bit of effort to tease out the nut meat.

17 August 2014

Rosita Arvigo

Written by Flora

Join us for this rare opportunity to study with Dr. Rosita Arvigo at the October 10-12 Herbal Conference!

Rosita-Photo-2014-webThe quest for the treasure of the Belize rainforest is Rosita Arvigo’s magnificent obsession. She believes that if she could locate and train with a natural healer trained in the old ways, she could begin to unlock the knowledge that would help people the world over regain their health. Like most great adventures this is easier said than done and often takes half a lifetime.

Dr. Arvigo has lived among the Maya in San Ignacio, Belize for the past thirty-five years. For thirteen years she apprenticed to the most famous Maya shaman-healer, Don Elijio Panti. Not only has Rosita’s life’s work kept Maya medicine alive, but she has been instrumental in cataloging and preserving thousands of healing plants and trees of Belize through her work with Dr. Michael Balick of The New York Botanical Garden and the Belize Ethnobotany Project which ran from 1987-1996.

24 July 2014

Aviva Romm

Written by Flora

Aviva-Romm-photo-2014-webAviva Romm MD is a family physician, midwife, herbalist, and mother of four grown children. A graduate of Yale, Aviva is a leader in the revolution to transform the medical system into one that respects the intrinsic healing capacities of the body--while helping women take their health into their own hands. Aviva Romm will be offering a few classes during the weekend, including: 

Pediatrics & Antibiotics
Our kids are the "canaries in the coalmine" with rates of asthma, allergies, and eczema skyrocketing. Learn how to protect kids from harmful over medication, treat common ailments naturally, and know when medical care is truly needed.

03 July 2014

Jewelweed

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

jewelweed flower

I just returned from a special journey back to my hometown, introducing my son for the first time to my old stomping grounds. When we went through the local Arboretum up there, I fondly recalled to him how, as a girl, I first met a particularly enchanting plant ally: jewelweed (Impatiens capensis).

In an Arboretum nature walk for children, the leader entranced me by submerging a translucent, serrated-edged jewelweed leaf in water, glistening silver like a mermaid underwater. And then removing it to show how the water droplets beaded up, like little “jewels” glittering in the sun! I still love to catch sight of her shimmering at the edges of ponds and streams after a light summer rain.

Adding to the fun were the distinctively spotted, brilliant orange cornucopia-shaped flowers that come out in the late summer. Turns out, their common name is “touch-me-not”, since the ripe flower seems rather ticklish and will shoot out spirals of seedpods when pinched or prodded—much to our delight!

18 June 2014

Celebrating 10 Years

Written by Flora

10thSunflowerWomanGraphicFor ten years now women have been experiencing the magic of the Southeast Wise Women Herbal Conference. Starting with around 200 women, today more that 1000 attend, coming together to learn, celebrate and connect.

For our 10th Anniversary we are excited to present these very special guests: Rosita Arvigo, Aviva Jill Romm, Kathleen Maier, Rachel Bagby, Monica Corrado, ALisa Starkweather, Corinna Wood, Jody Noe, Jessica Godino, Sarah Thomas and many more!

05 June 2014

Dandelion Dip

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Local Plants, Nourishing Foods

dandelion flowerHow can you not love dandelion? Friendly and familiar and so very versatile, those cheerful yellow flower heads practically beg “come on, pick me!” This time of year, dandelion is abundant and offers so much nourishment, I’m constantly harvesting her leaves and flowers for my salads.

I enjoy the tangy bite of her flavor, but I do realize that some of you may find her taste rather bitter. While the Western palate isn’t attuned to bitter elements (with the exception of coffee, which we often adjust with sweeteners and dairy), Chinese medicine recognizes the value of bitters in good digestive health and includes them in a well-balanced diet.

16 May 2014

Join us in 2014

Written by Flora

Southeast Wise Women offers two annual events that honor women and the earth. Both are celebratory, engaging, and educational, delving at the heart of Wise Woman Tradition. We are often asked what makes these two beloved programs similar and what sets them apart. Here are the details in a nutshell...

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02 May 2014

Sweet Ox-eye Daisy

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

cw cropped hatAfter the dormant months of winter, springtime is so sweet—made even sweeter by the appearance of that delightful lady, the oxeye daisy. I feel elated this time of year when I catch sight of her curvy, dark green leaves.

It was her flower — a beautiful, large yellow center surrounded by spreading white petals — that first drew me to her. Then I came to recognize the unique shape of her leaves. Oxeye daisy has toothed leaves like dandelion, but each of the little lobes are distinctly rounded and spoon-shaped.

 

08 April 2014

Sisterhood

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Self Love, Sisterhood

DSC 7452How I love this time of year, when everything is fresh and green and the world seems full of potential and possibility. Seeing the little shoots push their way up through the earth, reaching toward the sun, I can feel my own spirit renewed, refreshed and reinvigorated. It’s the longing for growth…healing…wholeness…

13 March 2014

Wild Salad Time

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Local Plants, Nourishing Foods

WildSaladHarvestedbyandforClass

Wild salad time already? Yes, with Spring Equinox right around the corner, the chickweed is already starting to sprout up! When I see her lush, green leaves I feel excited. It’s like seeing a beloved friend return, offering abundance and nourishment, in so many ways.
 
Wild salads are what inspired my interest in herbal medicine and nutrition in the first place. I wanted to be able to look around my yard and know what to eat. It reinforced my connection to the land on which I dwell and, over the years, wild edibles have added to my relationship to the divine as well. I find that the sacred and our bodies are one and the same; the experience of harvesting and eating these gifts of the Earth is deeply nourishing—physically, and spiritually.

19 February 2014

Nourishment Immersion

Written by Flora

chickweed saladSoutheast Wise Women Herbal Immersion May 25-30 2014. Discounts through March 20.

Nourishment is at the foundation of the Wise Woman Tradition. At both the fall Southeast Wise Women Herbal Conference and the spring Herbal Immersion, Sally Fallon's Nourishing Traditions cookbook is the guide for our menus. She turns our attention to delicious seasonal foods prepared with simple techniques which increase their nutrients and digestibility.

03 February 2014

The Beauty of Yogurt

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Nourishing Foods, Women's Wellness

6006 336360376466583 1820463906 nThis February, we find ourselves again at the time between Winter Solstice and Spring Equinox. Although the earth is beginning to show signs of stirrings and thaw, I'm still savoring the nourishment of the deep inward time of the winter.

This time of year was traditionally marked by one of the four Celtic fire feasts. Known as Imbolc, the name derived from Old irish "oimelc" which translates as "ewes' milk", as the sheep, goats, and cows often give birth in February. Their life-giving milk was an early source of abundant food to nourish and sustain through the remainder of the long, dark wintertime.

29 November 2013

Circle of Support

Written by Flora

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We are so grateful to be a part of this growing wise woman community. The beauty of each woman radiates outward, forming this web, including women of all shapes and sizes, from different backgrounds and walks of life. We get to share in our moments of strength and joy, and offer support to one another in times of need.

As the scholarship applications came pouring in, representing women who would love to attend the conference but are unable to participate in the work exchange program or afford the registration fees, we knew the amount of scholarship requests would quickly surpass the amount of money in the fund.

18 November 2013

Poke Root

Written by Corinna Wood, Posted in Corinna's Corner, Do It Yourself, Herbal Medicine, Local Plants

PokeRootLate fall is the best time to harvest roots. One of my apothecary favorites is a low-dose botanical - the root of the Poke plant. Often considered toxic, I discovered that in the South poke root has traditionally been used in tiny doses as an immune stimulant. This powerful plant actually has a wide range of medicinal uses -- but you have to treat it with respect or risk unpleasant side effects (see below).

Herbs can rival the effectiveness of antibiotics, and they're generally much gentler on the body. Some folks turn to goldenseal for this purpose, but it is an endangered species. Poke, on the other hand, is a weed -- the problem is not having too little of it, but too much. And for most purposes, poke is at least as good, if not better.

30 October 2013

The Hearth Fire

Written by Flora, Posted in Sisterhood

2013.10 hearth fire small

A peek behind the scenes of the Southeast Wise Women Herbal Conference . . .

Many hearts and hands weave throughout the year to support the annual fall gathering of herbal education, sisterhood, and community.

A highlight of last fall’s conference was the addition of a very special Hearth, nicknamed "Baby Brigit," which enabled us to have our fire circle in the heart of our gathering. The Hearth flames at Unity Village were tended throughout the weekend.

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